Don’t Stop Thinking About Tomorrow by Siobhan Curham – Book Review

Don’t Stop Thinking About Tomorrow by Siobhan Curham – Book Review

Dont Stop Thinking About Tomorrow by Siobhan Curham

Don’t Stop Thinking About Tomorrow

Author – Siobhan Curham
Publisher – Walker Books
Pages – 352
Released – 2nd August 2018
ISBN-13 – 978-1406379235
Format – ebook, paperback
Reviewer – Stacey
Rating – 5 Stars
I received a free copy of this book

 

An uplifting story of friendship, unity and hope that highlights the important and topical issues surrounding young carers and young refugees.

Fourteen-year-old Stevie lives in Lewes with her beloved vinyl collection, her mum … and her mum’s depression. When Stevie’s mum’s disability benefits are cut, Stevie and her mother are plunged into a life of poverty. But irrepressible Stevie is determined not to be beaten and she takes inspiration from the lyrics of her father’s 1980s record collection and dreams of a life as a musician.

Then she meets Hafiz, a talented footballer and a Syrian refugee. Hafiz’s parents gave their life savings to buy Hafiz a safe passage to Europe; his journey has been anything but easy. Then he meets Stevie…

As Stevie and Hafiz’s friendship grows, they encourage each other to believe in themselves and follow their dreams.

Review 2017

Stevie is the quiet girl at school, the one no-one wants to be friends with or sit next to. She tells herself that she isn’t bothered and that she doesn’t want nor need a friend as she doesn’t want to let anyone into her life.

Her dad died a couple of years ago and her mum fell into a deep depression unable to look after herself, never mind her daughter. She can’t go out to work and so money is tight. The pair struggle to have enough food to eat and Stevie is wearing last years, too small uniform to school.

Her only escape from her real life is through music, whether that be listening to one of the songs her father left her or playing her guitar. Music is her passion.

Hafiz has had to flee his home in war-torn Syria and travel to the UK to live with his Aunt and Uncle, leaving his parents behind. He hasn’t heard from his parents in a long time and is worried about them. He joins the local school and just wants to fit in and be accepted, but some of the children can only see him as a refugee, not a person.

He loves to play football, this is his passion, his escape from real life. He is selected for the school team. Even that has it’s own problems with some team players not liking the idea of a refugee playing for their team, even more so when it turns out that he is actually really good.

Stevie is given the task of helping Hafiz out on his first day. Together the two become inseparable, each drawn to the other via the reality of the harsh world we live in. Through their friendship, they learn to laugh, smile and find themselves again and create their own story.

Don’t Stop Thinking About Tomorrow is one of those books that when you get to the final word you sit there going over what you have just read. You need to let it all sink in and for your brain to process just how wonderful the book really was.

The storyline is completely relevant to the world we live in today and exceptionally realistic too. It is one of those books that you can perfectly visualise all the characters and the scenes, just like watching a movie.

Both Stevie and Hafiz had their own story to share and this was done via alternative POV chapters. These chapters were short and helped to keep the flow of the story moving nicely. The secondary characters each played their own role perfectly too. Some you will laugh along with, others you will want to reach into the book and make them see the errors of their ways.

The book is so poignant and I didn’t want to put it down once I had started reading. Ms. Curham has written with so much passion and knowledge that it comes across in the reading equivalent to Ultra HD.

This is a story that will pull at your heart-string and give you empathy and compassion for others. It will make you see the world differently and gives you the mindset to be a better human being. Don’t pass this book by, give it a read. It is a book not to be missed.

Book Reviewer – Stacey


Purchase online from:

Amazon.co.ukAmazon.comiTunes


About the Author

Siobhan Curham

Siobhan Curham is an award-winning author, editorial consultant, motivational speaker and life coach. Her books for young adults are: Dear Dylan (winner of the Young Minds Book Award), Finding Cherokee Brown (shortlisted for Wirral Paperback of the Year), Finding Your Inner Cherokee, Shipwrecked and Dark of the Moon (currently being developed for television), True Face, The Moonlight Dreamers and the Moonlight Dreamers sequel, Tell it to the Moon.

Her books for adults are: True Love Always, The Sweet Revenge of the Football Widows, The Scene Stealers and Antenatal & Postnatal Depression.

facebook new

Instagram

Website blue


Blog posts straight to email via Bloglovin – Like us on Facebook – Follow us on Twitter

You may also like...

20 Responses

  1. Jordanne says:

    This book sounds so adorable, it’s hard to find authors that write a convincing child/young person perspective – seems like she must have done a good job though. Great review!

  2. A wonderful review. I love the sound of this book and now I’ve got that song stuck in my head.

  3. Tasha says:

    The synopsis and your review make this sound like a great book. It’s great to find a 5* read. 🙂

  4. This sounds like a great read. I love books that are rooted in reality. Lovely review

  5. This sounds so cute and I love that song.

  6. Gayathri says:

    Your review is making the book all the more alluring.

  7. DJ Sakata says:

    I love it when a book keeps me pondering long after I’ve finished.

  8. Stormi says:

    This sounds like a great find! Especially since it deals with an issue that is affecting a large portion of the world right now. I hope your next read is as good!

    • I agree, there have been a few books recently that deal with issues of today’s society that I have read, I think they play an important role in educating people through fictional writing.

  9. Karla Strand says:

    Great review! I hadn’t heard of this book, so thanks for the recommendation!

  10. Allie Bock says:

    I love your review it looks like a lovely read.